Tuesday, 15 February 2011

Advice about tipping

Alright... here's my big dilemma.

When I lived in Australia, I would pay $60 for a haircut... actually my last couple of haircuts were only $35, but I'm a realist.... I know a good haircut in a major city usually goes for $60.

Now that I live in the States, I pay - drumroll - $60.

It is NOT customary to tip at all in Australia (unless you are so, so, so impressed with the job that the person did that you feel like they will be beamed up immediately to the highest glory).

When I pay for my haircut in my new hair salon (that is a worldwide chain and I have used in Sydney as well - same pricing), they ask me if I want to leave a tip.   I am completely confused and conflicted about this.  I like my haircut and have just told the hairstylist how wonderful she is, but I feel like after I've paid a good amount of money for it that I shouldn't be asked if I want to leave a tip.

Am I just being chinzy?  Please help me out my dear American friends... Is my hairstylist going to use spit in my conditioning treatment next time I go in?

p.s.  The first time I went, I did leave a $10 tip.  So we are kind of at a $5 tip a visit so far.  The average may get lower if I don't get some help soon!

9 comments:

Steph @ Diapers and Divinity said...

Um, yes, it sucks, but in America it's customary to tip a hairstylist the same as a waiter, 15-20%. This, of course, makes haircuts really expensive and is why my hair looks like overgrown crud most of the the time. Sorry.

DeNae said...

Adding to Stephanie's comment, you tip if the stylist is an employee of the salon in which they work. IF they are the owner of the salon, or are renting a space but are essentially self-employed, you are NOT obligated to tip. Tip jars in fast food places are little scams; unlike waiters at restaurants, who are paid less than minimum wage because the assumption is their income will be augmented by their tips, fast food employees earn minimum wage or higher and do not require tipping. (Sorry, all you tip jar kids; that's the rule.)

It is considered gauche for any owner or manager of a place where tipping is happening to accept a tip. They are usually salaried employees whose benefits far exceed those working under them.

The Kroks said...

Ever since I lived in Australia, tipping is just so annoying to me in general. However, I don't know why, but I am embarrassed to not leave a tip so I just do what is customary and tip everyone here. When in Rome...

Amelia and Elliott Smith said...

What would we do without the wisdom of DaNea :) I have a hard time tipping at salons because I feel like they are already getting a large portion of the price for the service itself, but I feel like a cheapo if I don't. When we are making millions I'll be a wonderful tipper (that almost looks like stripper, maybe I'll be a good one of those as well :)), but when it's already a stretch to get any "extras" the tipping is hard.

Becca said...

I tip 20% for food, but only 10% for other services Does that sound like I'm out there seeking many Other Services? Because I"m not. And when I recently had my first massage, I didn't know that I was supposed to tip. So I didn't. Oops.

Bron Williams said...

sounds like tipping sucks :) xx

KMitchell said...

I spoke to my sister who worked as an aesthetician and now works as a server in a restaurant. She said you should tip 15-18% as standard practice, more if you feel the person deserves it, and less if the service was poor. She gets peanuts in base salary at the restaurant so she really relies on her tips. She said she usually tips 20% as she knows they need it. I have to say I'm years out of practice and Ben says he's not doing it, so we may be rather stingy when push comes to shove. But then again he cuts his own hair and we seldom frequent restaurants with servers that aren't of a fast-food variety.

Andrew and Amy said...

Helen, It is expensive, but if you look around for coupons or deals you'll be amazed at all that's out there. Some salons even have promotions, like punch cards they mark with every hair cut you get and then on like the 5th cut you get a hair cut for free.) i also know of people who only go to the expensive, nicer salons to get a different look and then go to a much cheaper one ($15 cut) to maintain it. You could also find people who are stylist that work from home (ask around in your ward) and they typically are much cheaper, sometimes they will even come to you. It doesn't hurt to ask or look online for deals as well as there is a lot out there. My problem is that I get frustrated with my hair and take sissors to it before I see a stylest. Good luck!

Andrew and Amy said...

Helen, I almost forgot, there is a lot of beauty colleges around that have extemely low prices too. It's best to ask around for the best stylest, and if you like them to continue to request them. I've got some great cuts by girls who are about to graduate from these schools. They also do nails and things super cheap.